Apex court directs PIA to independently pick CEO

In a detailed judgement issued related to the case of the appointment of Musharraf Rasool Cyan as PIA’s CEO, the Supreme Court said the BoD is responsible for planning, succession and appointment of the company’s CEO

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ISLAMABAD: The apex court has observed the state-owned Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) board of directors (BoD) need to show independence, transparency, impartial and unbiased manners whilst choosing the best candidate for the post of the airlines’ chief executive officer (CEO).

In a detailed judgement issued related to the case of the appointment of Musharraf Rasool Cyan as PIA’s CEO, the Supreme Court said the BoD is responsible for planning, succession and appointment of the company’s CEO, reports Dawn.

According to the SC, it is the job of the BoD to assess potential candidates on the fit and proper criteria.

Justice Ijaz-ul-Ahsan in the detailed judgement elaborated that PIA’s BoD was commissioned to introduce a “code of conduct” for the operations of the board which includes the senior or junior officials of the airlines’ management.

As per the detailed judgement, firm conformity with the rudimentary principles of probity, propriety, integrity and honest have to be followed by the board to ensure that public assets aren’t ransacked.

“Or that no situation entailing a conflict of interest catering to personal benefit or vested, or political interest arises,” said the detailed judgement.

Moreover, the SC stated all directors need to declare their interests in the form of a register of interests associated with a proclamation to the outcome that wouldn’t gain any remuneration, compensation or other benefits in any other way, besides the entitled remuneration they get from the state-owned airline.

Additionally, the board needs to devise rules to lessen corruption, detection and monitoring of risks, acquiring goods and services including, however, not restricted to acquisition of assets along with disposal of assets and other investments, said the apex court.