How does KarMuqabla plan to create the pull in online education?

As the race heats up in the edtech space, what are the plans of this new entrant?

Education technology (or edtech) has not been able to create the buzz that would draw attention like startups in other sectors, but edtech startups are present and they are trying to digitalise education. We have all been hearing names such as EdKasa, Maqsad, Noon Academy, and Dot and Line. There is, however, another edtech startup in town that has remained hush and continued the grunt work of trying to find out what the education sector really needs. The edtech is called KarMuqabla, which seems to have figured out what the market needs and is ready to do the work of scaling it to a bigger level. 

The name might sound a little strong for an edtech company that focuses on the education of children, but the founder of the company, Aamer Ahmed Khan, believes that the name is fitting for the ultra-competitive world that we live in today. The name is going to be a continuous reminder very early on that it’s not going to be easy out there, so why not get comfortable with it. And keeping up with its name, KarMuqabla wants to infuse the spirit and confidence in students to compete in the world of education. 

KarMuqabla is out there with a fundamental philosophy that the traditional education establishments have been pushing knowledge onto students. A teacher teaching a class of 40 students can use interactive ways to teach but the philosophy behind such teaching has been that the knowledge must be pushed to students who are young in age and would be required to consume that knowledge regardless of liking or disliking the subject matter. That has been the case for a long time until the advent of technology that made it possible for third-party players like edtech companies to create mechanisms whereby students are ‘pulled’ towards new kinds of knowledge. 

“Students have fundamentally disengaged with education. There is a crisis of engagement. That is the crisis that we identified: the rest is all logistics,” says Aamer Ahmed, founder and CEO of KarMuqabla. “The pace of the crisis has something to do with the pace at which technology has been picking up in the last two decades.”  

“The younger generation, being very good with technology and very quick to learn how to use tech have caught up with technology in a manner that institutionally catching up to tech has remained comparatively slow. The schools were behind to catch up to technology while the students had already caught up to it.” 

 

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Taimoor Hassan
The author is a staff member and can be reached at [email protected]

5 COMMENTS

  1. Edtech in Pakistan is a sad reflection of a country where education is the last of the priorities. Copying Indian edtech models does not work as India (like China) is a huge education focus market.Most of the Pakistani edtech are being run by same younger lot who are running logistics type ventures. Even the investors putting funds are just completing their portfolio None of the founder is really from education unlike Byjus of India !!!

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